Henry Ford’s Model A

Photo Credit: Henry Ford Collection

Photo Credit: Henry Ford Collection

The Model A, also known as the “New Ford Car”, was originally introduced to the American public in 1927. Ford Motor Company was established in 1903 and showcased a rapid production line manufacturing the company’s flagship Model T. During the production of the Model T, Henry Ford clung to a past design he had created prior, dubbed the Model A. Only in the face of dwindling sales in 1920 did Ford realize the need for a new Ford automobile. This was Ford’s chance to bring his Model A concept to life. Alongside Edsel Ford, Henry’s son, Henry designed the Model A in response to Ford’s competitor’s newer models. Ford halted the production of the Model T in 1927 for 6 months in order to prepare for the Model A. Once these 6 months were up Ford was producing an entirely new model, the Model A. The first Model A engine, stamped “A1”, was installed in a Model A Tudor Sedan and was driven by Henry Ford himself to assess its quality and drivability. Ford found it to be up to his stringent standards and later had the same motor swapped into a 1928 Phaeton for his dear friend Thomas Edison.

Photo Credit: Henry Ford Collection

Photo Credit: Henry Ford Collection

Photo Credit: caranddriver.com

Photo Credit: caranddriver.com

Photo Credit: caranddriver.com

Photo Credit: caranddriver.com

The Model A showcased a new 3-speed transmission, four wheel mechanical brakes, and hydraulic shock absorbers. It also featured an electric starter, speedometer, gas gauge, and water pump. It sported a 3.3 liter “L-head” four cylinder that produced 40hp and 128 foot pounds of torque. This vehicle also introduced Triplex safety glass that was designed to avoid shattering upon impact. The Model A now stands as one of the highest production vehicles in history and will forever be remembered for its innovative design and its impact on the industry as a whole. The footprint that the Model A left on Detroit has been unparalleled ever since.

 

 

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